Difference Between Daemon and Demon…

11 Dec

I’ve been doing some research for my upcoming book Knight Angels: Gifted, and I came across and interesting idea. The term Dæmon has been used before, and you may know it from the popular P. Pullman series and The Golden Compass. In his book, a Daemon is the small creature beside you, that is essentially your soul and personality.

In Knight Angels, I am going to use it as a term for the good angels, or Guardian Angels, and then Demon to denote the dark angels. Demon vs. Daemon.

Official Definitions: Provided by Wiki

Demon: In religion, folklore, and mythology a demon (or daemon,[1] daimon from Greek: δαίμων daimōn) is a supernatural being that is generally described as a malevolent spirit. A demon is frequently depicted as a force that may be conjured and insecurely controlled. The “good” demon in recent use is largely a literary device (e.g., Maxwell’s demon), though references to good demons can be found in the work of Plato as well as Hesiod and Shakespeare.[2] In common language, to “demonize” a person means to characterize or portray them as evil, or as a source of evil. In modern usage, “personal demons” refer to an individual’s tormenting fears.

Dæmon: The words daemon, dæmon, are Latinized spellings of the Greek δαίμων (daimôn),[1] used purposely today to distinguish the daemons of Ancient Greek religion, good or malevolent “supernatural beings between mortals and gods, such as inferior divinities and ghosts of dead heroes” (see Plato’s Symposium), from the Judeo-Christian usage demon, a malignant spirit that can seduce, afflict, or possess humans.

As you can see, they are essentially the same, but a Dæmon is sometimes used more often as a good being and character. I am going to be leaning to the good side of this. It’s just a way for me to differentiate the two brothers of the story in a way that keeps them “related”…

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